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Somalia`s New Tongue Twisting Names
By Roobdoon Forum

How to Start
Your Own Xubin and Waax Country

By Roobdoon forum

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Somalia promises western firms oil riches as diplomats vow to defeat al-Shabaab
by Mark Townsend and Tracy McVeigh
The Observer
February 26, 2012


 
Engineers and visitors explore an exploratory well near Dharoor town, 350 km (217 miles) from the port of Bosasso on the Gulf of Aden in Puntland January 17, 2012. Canadian oil and gas exploration company Africa Oil Corp. began drilling an exploratory well in Somalia`s semi-autonomous Puntland region, the first to be sunk in the country since civil war erupted two decades ago. REUTERS


Somali prime minister says his country will give the west a share of natural resources in return for help with task of reconstruction


They expect the oil to flow within weeks. Coming from two miles underground, the crude should reach the arid plains of Puntland in the north-east corner of Somalia by April.


Around the same time, Somali diplomats say an offensive against al-Shabaab militia in the south of the country, backed by US drone strikes, should have damaged the Islamist group`s “effective fighting capability”.


Meanwhile, the UN plans to impose trade sanctions on the illicit international trade in charcoal, Somalia`s “black gold” which not only funds al-Shabaab but also destroys the country`s forests and led in part to last year`s widespread famine.


The promise of stability coupled with the apparent discovery of oil reserves could help to rebuild this poverty-stricken country. But experts warn the west must not pillage the newly found resources of Somalia, or risk massively escalating the conflicts already in the region. Kenya, Ethiopia and Uganda soldiers are in Somalia fighting al-Shabaab and each country has vested interests in Somalia`s future. Already a new militia, led by the unlikely-sounding Sheik Atom, has formed around Puntland`s oilfields.


The Somali prime minister, Abdiweli Mohamed Ali, speaking to the Observer after meeting Hillary Clinton and David Cameron at the London Somalia Conference last week, said that in the future a share of natural resources would be offered in return for help with reconstruction. “There`s room for everybody when this country gets back on its feet and is ready for investment,” he said. “Although now is not the time.


“What we need is capital from countries like the UK to invest. If the private sector can come in and do the work, then we welcome them.”


But many observers are uneasy about foreign interference in a country still emerging from 21 years of civil war and facing political transition. The mandate for Somalia`s transitional government runs out in August.


Chatham House analyst Adjoa Anyimadu said: “There`s already a lot of scepticism from parts of the Somalian community about the reasons for the sudden focus on Somalia and the reasons behind the UK`s interest.


“The potential for things to go wrong is high, for the population to feel they are being undermined or invaded by foreigners. Al-Shabaab has little credence with many Somalians but a foreign intervention could create a common enemy.”


While a new wealth could bring back the diaspora, she said, they too would need to be wary about riding roughshod over respected clan structures. “There are big gulfs between the experiences of those educated abroad and those living in Somalia. Everyone has a duty to make sure the population really does get a say in establishing governance so that it is seen as legitimate. The pressing issue remains food and security.”


Mark Bradbury, director of the Rift Valley Institute and author of several reports on Somalia, said oil was “a big game changer”. He added: “The international community has been very quiet on the whole exploitation of minerals and hydrocarbons. There is clearly potential for dispute between the relatively stable Puntland and the rest of the country. The positive end would be a federal government put in place with international support; the negative, a Somalia being divided up by international military forces.”


Markets expert Stuart Joyner, of Investec Securities in London, warned against the Somalis getting too carried away with the oil discoveries.


Somalia obviously has oil potential because it`s very close to some of the big east Africa finds and people are looking for more. It`s a very poor country so it`s going to help them, but in the global oil industry it`s nowhere.


“I`d be flabbergasted if the Puntland fields were worth the time of the big players such as BP or Shell. It will be more private investors.”


So the real corporate goal may well be not what is due to arrive on the surface next month but what is known to be under the Indian Ocean off Somalia`s coast - where sovereignty is unclear.


Drilling in Puntland by the Canadian firm Africa Oil began last month and transitional government officials, in London for David Cameron`s conference, said pipelines to the country`s ports had been laid.


Civil war, insecurity and lack of infrastructure ensured that the region became a no-go for western companies from the early 1990s when the government collapsed, leaving local warlords and militias to claw out territories.


For Americans, Somalia still holds the painful memory of the “Black Hawk Down” incident of 1993 when 18 members of a US helicopter assault force and an estimated 700 Somalis were killed in a battle in Mogadishu. A senior Somali delegate in London last week said creating the conditions for stability was essential. “If citizens of Britain are kidnapped, then that will interfere with progress.”


Dahabo Isse, from Mogadishu, and a prominent member of London`s Somali community, is among those concerned at the prospect of western multinationals profiting from their resources. “If resources go to the people, then fine, but if they take most of the oil money outside it is a worry.”


© Copyright 2012. The Observer. All rights reserved.


Mohamed Ali said his government had little choice but to entice western...
The Observer
February 26, 2012


Mohamed Ali said his government had little choice but to entice western companies to Somalia by offering a slice of the country`s natural resources, which include oil, gas and large reserves of uranium. “The only way we can pay [western companies] is to pay them in kind, we can pay with natural resources at the fair market value.”


Britain is not the only country looking to develop Somalia`s vast natural resources. Last month oil exploration began in Puntland by the Canadian company Africa Oil, the first drilling in Somalia for 21 years. Hashi, who sealed the Africa Oil deal, said the first oil was expected to be extracted within the next “20 to 30 days”.


The company estimates there could be up to 4bn barrels (about $500bn worth at today`s prices) in its two drilling plots. Other surveys indicate that Puntland province alone has the potential to yield 10bn barrels, placing it among the top 20 countries holding oil. Chinese and US firms are among those understood to have also voiced interest about the potential for oil now that, for the first time in 20 years, the country is safe enough to drill.


Yet it is the extent of oil deposits beneath the Indian Ocean that is most exciting Somali officials. One said the potential was comparable to that of Kuwait, which has more than 100bn barrels of proven oil reserves. If true, the deposits would eclipse Nigeria`s reserves - 37.2bn barrels - and make Somalia the seventh largest oil-rich nation.


The state-owned China National Offshore Oil Corporation has tried to acquire an interest in Somalia`s reserves. Senior officials from the Somali transitional government are adamant that the imminent extraction of oil in Puntland next month would kickstart a scramble from the multinationals.


On Thursday, the last day of the London conference, BP and Shell unveiled an initiative to support job-creation projects in the coastal regions of Somalia. A subsidiary of Shell was thought to have acquired exploration concessions in Puntland before the descent into lawlessness in 1991.


A BP spokesman said there were “no plans” to work in Somalia and no official had recently visited the country.


© Copyright 2012. The Observer. All rights reserved.


Britain leads dash to explore for oil in war-torn Somalia
Mark Townsend and Tariq Abdinasir
The Guardian
February 25, 2012


 
Shabeel-1


Government offers humanitarian aid and security assistance in the hope of a stake in country`s future energy industry


Britain is involved in a secret high-stakes dash for oil in Somalia, with the government offering humanitarian aid and security assistance in the hope of a stake in the beleaguered country`s future energy industry.


Riven by two decades of conflict that have seen the emergence of a dangerous Islamic insurgency, Somalia is routinely described as the world`s most comprehensively “failed” state, as well as one of its poorest. Its coastline has become a haven for pirates preying on international shipping in the Indian Ocean.


David Cameron last week hosted an international conference on Somalia, pledging more aid, financial help and measures to tackle terrorism. The summit followed a surprise visit by the foreign secretary, William Hague, to Mogadishu, the Somali capital, where he talked about “the beginnings of an opportunity`` to rebuild the country.


The Observer can reveal that, away from the public focus of last week`s summit, talks are going on between British officials and Somali counterparts over exploiting oil reserves that have been explored in the arid north-eastern region of the country. Abdulkadir Abdi Hashi, minister for international cooperation in Puntland, north-east Somalia – where the first oil is expected to be extracted next month – said: “We have spoken to a number of UK officials, some have offered to help us with the future management of oil revenues. They will help us build our capacity to maximise future earnings from the oil industry.”


British involvement in the future Somali oil industry would be a boon for the UK economy and comes at a time when the world is increasingly concerned about the actions of Iran, the second-biggest oil producer in Opec.


Hashi, in charge of brokering deals for the region`s oil reserves, also said Somalia was looking to BP as the partner they wanted to “help us explore and build our oil capacity”. He added: “We need those with the necessary technical knowhow, we plan to talk to BP at the right time.”


Somali prime minister Abdiweli Mohamed Ali said his government had little choice but to entice western companies to Somalia by offering a slice of the country`s natural resources, which include oil, gas and large reserves of uranium. “The only way we can pay [western companies] is to pay them in kind, we can pay with natural resources at the fair market value.”


Britain is not the only country looking to develop Somalia`s vast natural resources. Last month oil exploration began in Puntland by the Canadian company Africa Oil, the first drilling in Somalia for 21 years. Hashi, who sealed the Africa Oil deal, said the first oil was expected to be extracted within the next “20 to 30 days”.


The company estimates there could be up to 4bn barrels (about $500bn worth at today`s prices) in its two drilling plots. Other surveys indicate that Puntland province alone has the potential to yield 10bn barrels, placing it among the top 20 countries holding oil. Chinese and US firms are among those understood to have also voiced interest about the potential for oil now that, for the first time in 20 years, the country is safe enough to drill.


Yet it is the extent of oil deposits beneath the Indian Ocean that is most exciting Somali officials. One said the potential was comparable to that of Kuwait, which has more than 100bn barrels of proven oil reserves. If true, the deposits would eclipse Nigeria`s reserves – 37.2bn barrels – and make Somalia the seventh largest oil-rich nation.


The state-owned China National Offshore Oil Corporation has tried to acquire an interest in Somalia`s reserves. Senior officials from the Somali transitional government are adamant that the imminent extraction of oil in Puntland next month would kickstart a scramble from the multinationals.


On Thursday, the last day of the London conference, BP and Shell unveiled an initiative to support job-creation projects in the coastal regions of Somalia. A subsidiary of Shell was thought to have acquired exploration concessions in Puntland before the descent into lawlessness in 1991.


A BP spokesman said there were “no plans” to work in Somalia and no official had recently visited the country.


Al Shabaab says extends reach into Somalia`s Puntland
By Abdi Sheikh and Feisal Omar
February 25, 2012


MOGADISHU, Feb 25 (Reuters) - An Islamist militia group in Somalia`s semi-autonomous Puntland region has merged with the al Shabaab rebel group, said the insurgents on Saturday, a union which threatens to destabilise the relatively secure area targeted by oil explorers.


Al Shabaab said it wanted to scrap the licenses of Western oil and gas firms drilling in Puntland. The al Qaeda-backed insurgents used social media site twitter to declare all oil and gas exploration and drilling licenses nullified.


While they do not hold the administrative control in the region needed to enforce their demand, the militants could try to target installations operated by Western oil companies.


The Puntland administration was not immediately available for comment.


The union comes as the insurgents are being weakened, relinquishing ground to African Union troops around the Somali capital, Mogadishu, and losing territory to Kenyan and Ethiopian forces in parts of southern and central Somalia.


Puntland security officials have previously said the Islamist militia camped out in the Golis hills outside the port city of Bosasso is led by Yasin Khalid Osman.


“I ... the leader of Golis ranges Islamists have signed an agreement with al Shabaab leader Sheikh Muktar Abu Zubeir. We are now al Shabaab,” a voice identifying itself as Osman said in an audio recording on al Shabaab`s website.


“I urge residents to take part in the jihad against the Christian invaders and the Somali infidels that work with them,” he said, referring to the foreign troops inside Somalia.


Osman rarely makes statements and it was not immediately possible to verify his voice.


SHOWCASE


Last month, Canadian oil and gas exploration company Africa Oil Corp. began drilling an exploratory well in Puntland, the first to be sunk in the country since civil war erupted two decades ago.


Africa Oil and its partners in the two Puntland licences, Australia`s Red Emperor and Range Resources, are targetting prospective resources of over 300 million barrels of recoverable oil.


In a country that has lacked effective central government for two decades, Puntland`s relative stability is showcased by foreign powers advocating a loose federal political system in Somalia.


Some donors have focused development funding on the semi-autonomous region as a reward.


However, Puntland`s authorities have blamed the militants for the mounting insecurity in the region. While al Shabaab control parts of southern and central Somalia, they still have a much lighter presence further north.


“The jihad will be redoubled in those areas,” Sheikh Ali Mohamud Rage, al Shabaab`s spokesman, told Reuters.


(Additional reporting by Adbiqani Hassan in Bosasso; Writing by Richard Lough; Editing by Sophie Hares)


© 2012 Reuters Limited


Yusuf [Gaagaab] interested in profit split over natural resources
Upstream
December 21, 2007


PUNTLAND Minister of Finance Mohammed Yusuf [Gaagaab] says the autonomous republic could agree to a 40% or 50% profit split with the Somali Federal Government, if constitutional talks succeed in transforming the existing political arrangements in the near future.


Otherwise, the Africa Oil and Range Resources production sharing agreement specified a 50:50 profit split with the government and with royalties sliding between 4% and 10% off the top.


Most of the original PSA terms are drawn from the Yemen model applied to the Hunt Oil agreement, which has been adjusted to reflect political risk. The original Range deal was signed in 2005, which former prime minister Mohammed Gedi later opposed.


The final PSA and attendant work programme was signed earlier this year by the Transitional Federal Government President Abdullahi Yusuf of Puntland, according to Range Resources director Peter Landau.


“The Puntland constitution allows Garowe to grant rights to natural resources. Although such resources would form part of the federal Somali patrimony, once a firm system of government is introduced,” says Landau.


Range is assisting four Puntland graduates on petroleum courses at Curtin University in Perth, Australia and helping them pursue training at West Australia`s Department of Minerals & Energy.


It also aims to set up a similar office in Garowe that is capable of evaluating oil and minerals prospectivity and administering a licensing process.


Landau is not worried that oil giants will look to return to Puntland acreage at a future date, having earlier claimed force majeure during the civil war.


In 2003, Agip and Pecten were invited back but Pecten failed to even respond.


In 2002, ConocoPhillips listed Somali acreage in its annual report as part of its undeveloped portfolio and the following year removed all reference.


© 2007, Upstream.


 





 


 


 


 



sawirro
Sawirro Somaliya

/
Bosaso

muqdisho
Muqdisho of Yesteryears and Today’s Muuq-disho

 

 


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